KOA Educational Consulting LLC

Redefining the educational climate in the 21st Century

STEM

"...Leadership tomorrow depends on how we educate our students today - especially in science, technology, engineering, and math." ~ President Barack Obama

The United States has become a global leader, in large part, through the genius and hard work of its scientists, engineers and innovators. Yet today, that position is threatened as comparatively few American students pursue expertise in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)—and by an inadequate pipeline of teachers skilled in those subjects. President Obama has set a priority of increasing the number of students and teachers who are proficient in these vital fields.

The need: Only 16 percent of American high school seniors are proficient in mathematics and interested in a STEM career. Even among those who do go on to pursue a college major in the STEM fields, only about half choose to work in a related career.

The goals: President Obama has called on the nation to develop, recruit, and retain 100,000 excellent STEM teachers over the next 10 years. He also has asked colleges and universities to graduate an additional 1 million students with STEM majors. These improvements in STEM education will happen only if Hispanics, African-Americans, and other underrepresented groups in the STEM fields—including women, people with disabilities, and first-generation Americans—participate.

The plan: Coordinated efforts to improve STEM education are outlined in the Federal 5-year Strategic Plan for STEM Education and will concentrate on improving the delivery, impact, and visibility of STEM efforts. The Department of Education, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution will lead efforts to implement initiatives in the four core reform areas, with CoSTEM—as a whole—leading efforts to improve outcomes for traditionally underrepresented groups. The administration will coordinate and streamline federal efforts to improve STEM education.

For more information go to http://www.ed.gov/stem